Antigen

Antigen is a substance or molecule that, when introduced into the body triggers the production of an antibody by the immune system, which will then kills or neutralizes the antigen that is recognized as a foreign and potentially harmful invader.

These invaders can be molecules such as pollen or cells such as bacteria. The term originally came from antibody generator and was a molecule that binds specifically to an antibody, but the term now also refers to any molecule or molecular fragment that can be bound by a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and presented to a T-cell receptor. "Self" antigens are usually tolerated by the immune system; whereas "Non-self" antigens are identified as intruders and attacked by the immune system. Autoimmune disorders arise from the immune system reacting to its own antigens.


In similar manner, an immunogen is a specific type of antigen. An immunogen is defined as a substance that is able to provoke an adaptive immune response if injected on its own. Stated another way, an immunogen is able to induce an immune response, whereas an antigen is able to combine with the products of an immune response once they are made. The overlapping concepts of immunogenicity and antigenicity are, therefore, subtly different.

Immunogenicity is the ability to induce a humoral and/or cell-mediated immune reaction.

Antigenicity is the ability to combine specifically with the final products of the immune response. Although all molecules that have the property of immunogenicity also have the property of antigenicity, the reverse is not true."

At the molecular level, an antigen is characterized by its ability to be "bound" at the antigen-binding site of an antibody. Note also that antibodies tend to discriminate between the specific molecular structures presented on the surface of the antigen.

Antigens are generally proteins or polysaccharides. This includes parts (coats, capsules, cell walls, flagella, fimbrae, and toxins) of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms. Lipids and nucleic acids are antigenic only when combined with proteins and polysaccharides. Non-microbial exogenous (non-self) antigens can include pollen, egg white, and proteins from transplanted tissues and organs or on the surface of transfused blood cells. Vaccines are examples of immunogenic antigens intentionally administered to stimulate acquired immunity in the receiver.

Cells present their immunogenic-antigens to the immune system via a histocompatibility molecule. Depending on the antigen presented and the type of the histocompatibility molecule, several types of immune cells can become activated.

article source: wikipedia 

3 komentar:

karafuruworld said...

nice posting, bro!
jadi inget kisah Detective Conan, yang minum paikal, trus kalo diminum keseringan, malah bisa nimbulin antigen...

nutritionalis said...

Great post! Read more about Antigen. This post is linked there.

tindra pitter said...

Nice start guys...I went through the website and I found that you made a decent point here. Keep up the topic that everyone can choose one of the best. Thanks.
Antigens and antibodies

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